Posts Tagged ‘Toronto’

This is a Thursday Doors post. 

I wanted to find a poem or a quote or something like that to accompany this post.  A post about opening doors to get home.  I only found poetry best said at a funeral…  not so good for a sunny March afternoon.   I’ll save the poetry in case I ever do a series of cemetery doors.

How many doors do you go through in a day?

You aren’t going to find any historical doors here nor have I taken any pictures of colourful, ornate, or classy doors for this post.  Instead, I decided to use photos of a few of the doors that I had to pass through on my way home the last time I went exploring, starting with the subway at St. Patrick station.

a woman is opening the glass doors of St. Patrick station, at street level, on University Ave

two sets of double doors, TTC subway station, metal doors with glass insets.

doors to bus platform at Davisville station, bus platform, are slightly ajar, a bus has just pulled up (and facing the camera) and people are getting ready to get on it.

people getting on a TTC bus at Davisville station

These are doors that I pass through frequently yet I rarely notice them.   Usually I see them more as an impediment to where I want to go.   Maybe I should pay them more attention?

***

For Thursday Door posts by other people, see Norm Frampton’s blog at Norm 2.0.  He is the originator of the Thursday Door idea and he also keeps track of which other blogs have participated.

 

 

Thousands of people (50,000?), men, women and children, rallied at Queens Park and then marched down University Avenue past the American Embassy this afternoon.  This was the Womens March in Toronto, a march in response to Donald Trump’s inauguration as President of the United States.  It coincided with similar events in Washington, most major cities in North America, and other cities around the world.  The Toronto marchers ended their walk at Nathan Phillips Square.  It was a peaceful, positive event.

a young woman holds up a large pink sign that says open hearts make open minds. Womens March, toronto

a sign at Womens March in Toronto that says The true revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love,

It was also a family event.  There were a lot of kids walking with their parents (or being pushed in strollers).  Many of the kids had made their own signs to carry.

 

a young boy in a blue hat carries a placard that he's made that says Noooooo and has a picture of Donald Trump with a black Darth Vader mask on.

There were also many people that came as groups, whether as groups of friends or groups united in a cause.

a group of women carrying a banner that has been made of many crocheted granny squares and the words we can't keep up. womens march in Toronto, waiting at Queens Park for the march to begin.

There were a few signs using the “We The People” designs by Shepard Fairey.

a man holds a sign up in the air, above the heads of out protesters at the Womens March, a Shepard Fairey design of a woman in stars and stripes American flag head scarf withthe words "We the People"

Womens March, toronto - a group of people leaning over the edge of the upper level at Nathan Phillips, holding their placards and signs over the concrete. Two of the women are wearing white T-shirts on which they've drawn black outlines of breasts.

a young girl in a purple jacket is sitting on the branch of a tree. Her sign is strung over the branch and it says Teach me to see injustice teach me to act. People in the Womens March, toronto are walking past her in the background.

Donald Trump swings happily on a wrecking ball.

protest march and rally at Queens Park, large crowd of people with signs and pink hats. A man has a cutout of a naked Donald Trump swinging on a large wrecking ball.

I march for equality and peace.
I’d rather have a queen than a trump.

In front of the building at QUeens Park, a large group of people has congregated for Womens March, toronto . One woman holds a sign that says I march for equality and peace. Another woman has a flag draped over her back with says I'd rather have a queen than a trump

Womens March, Toronto, a young girl in a grey hat holds a white sign that says I may be small but my voice is loud.

There were lots of references to nasty women!

a boy holds up a sign that says Son of a Nasty Woman, #whyimarch, Womens March, toronto

Many people wore pink hats.  These mysterious two took it a step further, pink balaclavas.

two people wearing pink hats pulled down over their faces with three holes cut in it, two for eyes and one for mouth. At a protest rally against Donald Trump

a young woman amidst a crowd of others walking in the Womens March in Toronto, holding a large pink sign that syas what the fuck

a group holds a white banner as they walk in the Womens March, the banner says A woman's place is in the struggle.

Womens March, toronto - a woman holds a large pink sign up over her head that reads In yer guts you know he's nuts. She's walking with many other people

4 women pose for a picture, two are holding up a banner that says Catholic Network for WOmens Equality. Womens March, toronto . Lots of other eople, men, women and children, walking with them,

Love not fear, and a pink hard hat too!

a young girl carried a brightly painted sign that says Love not fear. She is walking with her mother in the Womens March on University Ave. She is also wearing a pink hard hat.

A person is up in a tree, looking over a crowd of people at Queens Park, Womens March, toronto

a white dog has a sign on its side that says Bitches Against Trump

Three black women, one with a head scarf on, hold a sign that says Don't silence women of colour, part of a crowd at Womens March, toronto

Womens March, toronto - a man holds up a sign that is a play on the evolution of man meme, as they walk upright they come to a figure of Donald Trump. The last man in the evolution chain turns around and says Go back, we fucked up.

Womens March, Toronto, a woman with a red sign saying This is my resting march face, hams it up for the camera

a man holds a sign that says Fight like a girl. and a woman beside him the march holds a sign that says complacency breeds inequality.

Free Melania | #freemelania

two boys watch protesters at the Womens March, toronto . One of the boys holds a sign that says Free Melania.

a young girl in pink holds a sign that says love love love. Womens March, toronto

a woman stands in a crowd at NathanPhillips Square, Womens March, toronto - she is holding a sign that says Keep your hands off our cuntstiutional rights.

girls are strong

a young girl holds a sign that says girls are strong. She's written it herself on cardboard.

Women have rights and we’re gonna use them!  … with rainbows.

a girl in pink is holding a sign that says WOmen have rights and we're gonna use them. She is shouting as she marches, Womens March, toronto . There are other kids with her

A loud hear us roar!

a woman stands beside the base of one of the statues at QUeens Park, she is holding a large pink sign with big colourful writing that says hear us roar. Womens March, toronto

camera man stands on a high level of ground along with some large black speakers. The heads of some women can be seen , all wearing pink hats for the Womens March

two women smile for the camera as they walk past. Both are wearing red heart shaped glasses.

Donald Trump was at the march too, even if only in effigy.

a person holds an effigy of Donald Trump on a stick up in the air diring the Womens March down University Ave.,

On University Ave., WOmens March, a woman holds a sign that is a merger of two symbols - female and solidarity. Lots of other men and women are around,

a young girl in pink sits on top of the War Memorial at QUeens Park, the parliament buildings are behind her.

a woman holds a sign up above her head. It says My husband wanted to be here but he is doing the laundry

The march stopped for a few minutes when it reached Queen Street.  There was much traffic confusion and chaos (and honking of horns) at the intersection of Queen and University until the police closed all traffic on Queen Street.

intersection of Queen and University, people standing on the sidewalk looking at the Womens March as it stops on University. Policemen trying to direct traffic on Queen as they prepare to close Queen Street for the march

Orange? No. I’m peach.   Great play on words.

a woman is holding a sign at the Womens March, toronto . Donald Trump's head is shaped like a peach and the words say Im peach.

kids walking together in Womens March, toronto hold signs that they have made on cardboard.

Make America gay again!!

A woman holds up a sign that says Make America Gay again. Lots of other people around her at Queens Park at the start of the Womens March, toronto

a woman walking in the Womens March, toronto holds up a read sign that says Make Empathy great again. Lots of other men and women walking in the same picture.

And that’s only part of the crowd at Nathan Phillips Square!

Taken from the upper level at Nathan Phillips Square, overlooking the square which is full of people attending Womens March, toronto . In the foreground are a couple of people who are also on the upper level.

a woman holds a sign that says patriarchy is for dicks

a woman holds up a red sign that says March like a girl, Womens March, toronto

Womens March, toronto - the head of the march goes past Osgoode Hall on QUeen Street. A woman with a megaphone is leading the chants and singing. A large group with a banner that says Womens March is the first group in the walk

standing behind the barricades by the stage at Nathan Phillips Square, a large group of people at the Womens March, toronto . Many signs and many people. and a reporter with a camera.

“Babies against Trump.  We don’t like it when people call Trump a baby – we act better than him.”

a man carries a baby in front of him, with a yellow sign that says Babies against trump, marching in the Womens March in Toronto with other men and women.

a group of people wearing black and holding red carnations is holding a large black coffin on their shoulders. Written on the coffin is the word patriarchy. The death of patriarchy.

a group of people with signs and placards in a crowd at Nathan Phillips Square. Womens March, toronto

Women’s rights are human rights.

two women stand on the sidewalk, one is drinking coffee and wearing a pink hat. The other is holding a sign that says womens rights are human rights in pink letters ona background of black and white photos.

an older womaloosely woven pink hat with wide brim, and a pink top, holds a sign at a march

Womens March, Toronto - women smiling and posing for the camera, wearing pink pussy hats

 

#whyImarch | #womensmarch | #nastywoman | #lovetrumpshate | #noh8

But not just any squirrel.  Toronto has many, many squirrels.  Most of them are black and a few are grey or even a reddish colour.  The rarest squirrels in the city are the albino squirrels.  I’m not sure how many there are but they can most often be seen around Trinity Bellwoods Park.

It is fitting then that this mural is next to the park, in a little lane just north of Queen West that ends at Gore Vale Avenue.  It’s a very large albino squirrel; it looks like it fits comfortably into a lovebot heart.

a large mural on white wall of a red lovebot heart and on the heart is a large albino squirrel (white squirrel) with pinkish eyes and ears.

Happy New Year greetings to one and all!
May you walk many miles and explore many places.

a happpy new year sign hangs from the ceiling in a window, the view from the window is in the background, the Toronto skyline with the CN Tower and Lake Ontario

Just before Dupont Street ends at Dundas West, it passes under a set of railway tracks…
and of course another underpass means another mural.

It is an Art Starts project “honouring the Junction and paying homage to its industrial past rooted in the railway and celebrating its development as a diverse neighbourhood oriented community. ”  Lead artists Joshua Barndt and Jamie Bradbury along with 5 youth artists took 4 weeks to complete the mural.

mural on a concrete wall beside a sidewalk, just before the road goes under an underpass - large purple triangel, drawing of a locomotive and a couple of gears

The mural was funded by the City of Toronto’s Graffiti Transformation Program.

mural on a concrete wall beside a sidewalk, just before the road goes under an underpass, gears, plus a stylized industrial machine in black and blue

mural on a wall showing a picture of worker in a hard hat, reaching upwards, standing on a pile of bicycle wheels.

mural on the wall of an underpass, in the Junction, on Dupont, a line drawing of a railway car, with a large blue bike superimposed on top of it, a person holding a stop sign,

Cycling is used as a theme and as a way of traveling from the past to the future in the mural.

mural on the walls of an underpass, orange metal bridge, mural of cyclists riding their bikes

mural under a bridge of people riding bikes

a wall of an underpass curves as it exits the railway bridge. on the curve is the continuation of a mural that was painted on the walls of the underpass. Windmills and bikes.

mural on a curved concrete wall, beside an intersection, showing windmills with bike parked in front, and a forest with some animals in it, fox and wolf

below: The final panel in the mural, a future friendly city.

part of a mural, the word city is used to make a futuristic urban scene in blue tones. The future is friendly.

logo of two black gears side by side with the words Art Starts written across the middle of them. a small graffiti painting of a girl's head with a heart above it

This post is subtitled ‘Staying Cool on a Hot Hot Day’.  When the temperatures are into the 90’s (old style) and the humidity makes the air thick, walking streets and alleys is not very comfortable.  Instead I took refuge in air conditioned arty places.  With the help of the (mostly) air conditioned TTC I only needed to take a few steps outside.

below: At one point I walked through an air conditioned building rather than going outside.  This is what I found there. ‘August 6, 1945’ by Matthew Day Jackson.  Moments after I pulled my camera out of my backpack, a security guard appeared.  I was sure that once again I was going to get the “this is private property” talk but instead we ended up discussing the work and how it is displayed.

It is constructed of four panels and it’s very heavy.  The base is made of lead; you can see the lead where Lake Ontario is.  It is attached to the wall with 18 very long bolts and each bolt is wired to an alarm.

map of toronto made of charred wood and lead, meant to resemble the city after an atomic bomb, large, made by Matthew Day Jackson, hanging on a wall behind a metal railing.

below:  Looking a bit more closely at it you can see that it is a map of Toronto.  As you might have surmised,  the title is a reference to the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima by the USA during WW2.    This isn’t just any map of Toronto, it’s an aerial view of a burnt out city after a nuclear explosion.  It is one in a series of cities given similar treatment, all with the same title.

detail of the islands and downtown area of map of toronto made of charred wood and lead, meant to resemble the city after an atomic bomb, large, made by Matthew Day Jackson

From the effects of man made death to the life enhancing effects of nature….

below: A few steps outside took me past the Gardiner Museum where I noticed that the front garden was redone about a year ago.  ‘Vertical Crevice Garden’ was designed and donated by landscape artist Neil Turnbull.  From the Gardiner museum website, a quote by the artist: “When the massive forces of continental drift push against layers of sedimentary rock, they cause it to crack, break, and rise. Over centuries, through exposure to wind, sun, and the freeze-thaw cycle, the layers split open. These fissures and crevices collect rain, dust, and an array of windblown bits like seeds and spores; plants take root, and life takes hold.”

limestone rocks arranged on a slant in a garden, stripes of red rock and grey rock, all just a few inches off the ground

below: When walking past the Gardiner Museum, one can’t help but notice the striped head.  It’s actually called ‘Untitled’ (why do artists do that?) and it’s by Jun Kaneko, 2002.  It’s made of glazed ceramic and galvanized steel.   Before heading underground at Museum subway station I took a few minutes to try to take a ‘pretty’ picture of the head.  The plants in the garden next door haven’t quite grown up enough to hide that ghastly table that the head sits on.  I have always wondered why the museum chose such a mundane bland platform for the sculpture but now that I look at it again I wonder if it’s possible that the table is actually part of the artwork.  Could it be?

large striped head sculpture on a table, outside, by Jun Kaneko, old building behind it, lavender and other plants growing in front of it.

below:  A photograph in the doorway of a gallery caught my eye.  The picture below is not the one in the doorway, but one that was hanging on a wall inside that I liked even more.  ‘Paris Rooftops 4’ by Michael Wolf.  It is 48″ x 68″ and is a chromogenic print (full-colour silver-based photograph), edition of 9.   To buy it will set you back $22,000 but looking is free – check out more of Michael Wolf’s work on the Bau-Xi gallery website.

picture of a photograph by Michael Wolf of Paris rooftops. Concrete grey with lots of lines of little terra cotta chimneys

below: A man with a camera stares at a painting on a gallery wall.  ‘Watching’ 2010, (26 inches high) by Tom Campbell on the left and ‘Brown Trail #7’ 2016 by Shi Le, a Toronto based landscape artist.  These are at the other Bau-Xi gallery (the non-photography one)

a small sculpture of a man holding a camera is placed in an art gallery such that he seems to be looking at a painting on the wall.

below: Three paintings by NUBARR Gallery, a collection of the works of Armenian-Canadian painter Noubar Sabag (Noubar Sabbaghian) 1920-2006.   These, and others by the same artist, are on show at the Art Square Cafe & Gallery but unfortunately I just learned that today is the last day.

a woman in a floppy black hat is taking pictures of three paintings hanging on a gallery wall.

below:  How many people try to paint pictures like this?  How many people sell such paintings, not to mention have them hang in the Art Galley of Ontario?  But they aren’t Robert Motherwell.      So I ponder on the age old question of what makes a piece of art valuable or collectable?  Is the AGO (and other galleries) collecting paintings or names?  Motherwell painted this in numerous variations – a few changes in colour, a slight change in the lines.  Cheating?  Or brilliant marketing?  One for every gallery of note? This is Motherwell’s ‘Untitled (In Orange with Charcoal Lines)’ c1970.  There’s that “untitled” again, the most popular name for an artwork.

all orange with 3 black lines that form three sides of a square, top line of the square is missing. It's a picture of a painting by Robert Motherwell in an art gallery

My last stop of the afternoon was at the photography exhibit by Thomas Ruff at the AGO.  Part of the exhibit was a few large photographs of stars,  ‘Sterne’.  Large pictures of stars in the night sky were made from negatives that Ruff bought from the European Southern Observatory in Chile in 1989.

below:  They are difficult to look at, or rather it is difficult to what is the picture because the blackness of the photograph creates a mirror when placed behind glass.   This is me taking a picture of the picture – me plus the picture on the opposite wall plus the lights and light fixtures in the ceiling plus a table plus another person in the room plus a few white spots that are stars.

large photograph of the night sky, lots of stars and blackness. The black acts like a mirror and parts of the gallery are reflected in the picture.

below: ‘Walking Away, Walking Through the Universe’ a manipulation of a manipulation.

a reflection of two people walking hand in hand as seen reflected in a photograph of stars in the black night sky

below:  One last photo.  Let’s end this on a positive note and give Thomas Ruff credit for some interesting work.   These two pictures are part of his press++ series where he has taken old photos used in print medium and merged the front (picture) and back (words and markings) of the print into one.

a woman is standing in an art gallery and she is looking at two large pictures on the wall.

Thomas Ruff, Object Relations, at the AGO until 1 August 2016

Many people walked and danced, clapped and chanted, as they paraded down Yonge Street on Saturday to start the annual Festival of India weekend.

The parade is similar to an annual procession (Ratha Yatra) that has occurred for centuries in the city of Puri, India as part of a Hindu festival associated with the god Jagannath.  Here in Toronto, as in Puri,  three chariots constructed to look like temples are pulled through the streets in a procession from one temple to another.    Each chariot carries a richly decorated representation of a god, first is  Jagannatha (another name for Krishna or God) and then his brother Baladeva and his sister Subhadra.   The chariots are pulled by people and the procession symbolizes the pulling of the Lord into our hearts.

In Puri, this Ratha-Yatra procession continues to attract over a million people every year.  In Toronto, the numbers aren’t quite that high!

a police car drives slowly in front of a parade as it makes its way down Yonge Street

people walk behind a yellow horizontal banner that reads Festival of India, Join us at Centre Island.

two women in sarees are pulling on a large rope in a parade. In the foreground, a man is pulling on another rope.

a group of young South Asian women walking in a parade. One of them has her face decorated with paint. In front of them is a group of young men in yellow tops and white bottoms, one has a drum.

South Asian, Indian, women, in long colourful sarees dancing as they move down Yonge Street in a parade

some older people dressed in white riding high in the chariot float in the Festival of India parade, others walking in front and pulling ropes to make the chariot move.

South Asian, Indian, women, in long colourful sarees dancing as they move down Yonge Street in a parade, lifting their skirts a little bit as they move

people walking in front of one of the chariots in the Festival of India parade in Toronto

a large blue wheel that is holding up a chariot float in the Festival of India parade, people walking beside and behind it as they walk down Yonge Street

lifting the red rope that separates the parade from the traffic, women dancing and clapping and walking as well as other people, pulling ropes to pull the chariot in the parade