Posts Tagged ‘Queens Park’

subtitle: Hanging out in front of Queen’s Park

There is a collection of statues in the front of Queen’s Park.  With the exception of the statue of Queen Victoria, they are of men who helped shape Toronto, Ontario, and Canada in the early years.    I was going to spend some time writing about what each person did but this post started to become very dull.  I don’t mean to diminish the accomplishments of these men, but reading a summary of their lives isn’t the most interesting way to spend time.   If you want to learn more about any of them, I’m sure you can find much more information online!

First, the monarch.  Queen Victoria.  She was born in 1819 (almost 200 years ago!) and became Queen in 1837 when just 18 years old.  She reigned for more than sixty years until her death in January of 1901.   Her husband, and father of her 9 children, was her first cousin Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.   The fact that her statue’s here is no surprise.  Queen’s Park was named in her honour after all – it was opened by her son Edward in 1860.  The statue though didn’t appear here until 1902, after her death.  It was designed by Mario Riggi.

statue of Queen Victoria in bronze. She's seated, wearing crown and holding mace/staff

Also in the front of the parliament buildings are the statues of six other historical figures:  Sir John A. Macdonald, John Graves Simcoe, Sir Oliver Mowat, George Brown, John Sandfield Macdonald, William Lyon Mackenzie, and Sir James Whitney.  Most people would recognize Sir John A. Macdonald as the first Prime Minister of Canada and some Torontonians might be familiar with the contributions of Mr. Simcoe to their history, but the other four men, who are they?

Let’s start with John Sandfield Macdonald (no relation to Sir John A. )   He was born in Glengarry County Upper Canada in 1812.  He was the first Prime Minister (Premier) of Ontario, starting with Confederation  and the formation of the province of Ontario on 1st July 1867.  He held that position until 1871.  The sculpture is by Walter Allward, 1909.

statue of a man, John Sandfield Macdonald, in front of the parliament buildings at Queens Park. An Ontario flag is reflected in the windows of the building.

 

Next,  Sir Oliver Mowat .  He was born in Kingston Ontario in 1820.  In 1840 he moved to Toronto to study law but in 1857 he was elected a Liberal member of the Legislature of the Province of Canada.  He held various government positions at both the provincial and federal levels up until his death in 1903.  He took part in the Quebec Conference of 1864 which led to Confederation in 1867.  He was the third Prime Minister (Premier) of Ontario after John Sandfield Macdonald and Edward Blake (who was leader for less than a year and has no statue).  He led from 1872 to 1896.     During his almost 24 years as leader of the Ontario Legislature he introduced the secret ballot in elections and extended suffrage beyond property owners.  He also created the municipal level of government.  Between 1897 and his death he was a Senator and then the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario.  This monument was unveiled in 1905 and was also designed by Walter Allward.

black statue of a man, Sir Oliver Mowat, standing with a book in one hand, and the other hand behind his back. The figure is on top of a grey stone rectangular column, autumn tree in the background.

below: Sir James Whitney was a member of the Ontario Legislative Assembly from 1888 until his death in 1914.  For the later part of those years he was the Premier of Ontario – he was elected four times as Premier.  The statue was sculpted by Hamilton MacCarthy and was unveiled in 1927

statue of a mna with his right arm extended, Whitney, in front of the parliament buildings at Queens Park.

I’ve also included William Lyon Mackenzie (1795-1861) with this group of men even though his statue is more to the west of the parliament buildings than in front of them.   He was the first mayor of Toronto (1834) although he was only mayor for a year.   He was also a leader of the Upper Canada Rebellion in 1837.

statue of William Lyon Mackenzie, shown from the waist up and missing his arms, trees in leaf behind him,

below: The oldest man of the lot is John Graves Simcoe (1752-1806), founder of the city of Toronto, the designer of Yonge Street, and one busy man in his time.

statue of a man in bronze standing on a grey stone column, yellow tree behind him. He's got a sword in one hand, with its point on the ground and he is leaning on it slightly

And last, the most well known of the men, Sir John A. Macdonald, first Prime Minister of Canada.

statue of Sir John A. Macdonald, first Prime Minister of Canada, on a grey day, in front of the Ontario Legislature at Queens Park in Toronto,

 

 

 

Thousands of people (50,000?), men, women and children, rallied at Queens Park and then marched down University Avenue past the American Embassy this afternoon.  This was the Womens March in Toronto, a march in response to Donald Trump’s inauguration as President of the United States.  It coincided with similar events in Washington, most major cities in North America, and other cities around the world.  The Toronto marchers ended their walk at Nathan Phillips Square.  It was a peaceful, positive event.

a young woman holds up a large pink sign that says open hearts make open minds. Womens March, toronto

a sign at Womens March in Toronto that says The true revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love,

It was also a family event.  There were a lot of kids walking with their parents (or being pushed in strollers).  Many of the kids had made their own signs to carry.

 

a young boy in a blue hat carries a placard that he's made that says Noooooo and has a picture of Donald Trump with a black Darth Vader mask on.

There were also many people that came as groups, whether as groups of friends or groups united in a cause.

a group of women carrying a banner that has been made of many crocheted granny squares and the words we can't keep up. womens march in Toronto, waiting at Queens Park for the march to begin.

There were a few signs using the “We The People” designs by Shepard Fairey.

a man holds a sign up in the air, above the heads of out protesters at the Womens March, a Shepard Fairey design of a woman in stars and stripes American flag head scarf withthe words "We the People"

Womens March, toronto - a group of people leaning over the edge of the upper level at Nathan Phillips, holding their placards and signs over the concrete. Two of the women are wearing white T-shirts on which they've drawn black outlines of breasts.

a young girl in a purple jacket is sitting on the branch of a tree. Her sign is strung over the branch and it says Teach me to see injustice teach me to act. People in the Womens March, toronto are walking past her in the background.

Donald Trump swings happily on a wrecking ball.

protest march and rally at Queens Park, large crowd of people with signs and pink hats. A man has a cutout of a naked Donald Trump swinging on a large wrecking ball.

I march for equality and peace.
I’d rather have a queen than a trump.

In front of the building at QUeens Park, a large group of people has congregated for Womens March, toronto . One woman holds a sign that says I march for equality and peace. Another woman has a flag draped over her back with says I'd rather have a queen than a trump

Womens March, Toronto, a young girl in a grey hat holds a white sign that says I may be small but my voice is loud.

There were lots of references to nasty women!

a boy holds up a sign that says Son of a Nasty Woman, #whyimarch, Womens March, toronto

Many people wore pink hats.  These mysterious two took it a step further, pink balaclavas.

two people wearing pink hats pulled down over their faces with three holes cut in it, two for eyes and one for mouth. At a protest rally against Donald Trump

a young woman amidst a crowd of others walking in the Womens March in Toronto, holding a large pink sign that syas what the fuck

a group holds a white banner as they walk in the Womens March, the banner says A woman's place is in the struggle.

Womens March, toronto - a woman holds a large pink sign up over her head that reads In yer guts you know he's nuts. She's walking with many other people

4 women pose for a picture, two are holding up a banner that says Catholic Network for WOmens Equality. Womens March, toronto . Lots of other eople, men, women and children, walking with them,

Love not fear, and a pink hard hat too!

a young girl carried a brightly painted sign that says Love not fear. She is walking with her mother in the Womens March on University Ave. She is also wearing a pink hard hat.

A person is up in a tree, looking over a crowd of people at Queens Park, Womens March, toronto

a white dog has a sign on its side that says Bitches Against Trump

Three black women, one with a head scarf on, hold a sign that says Don't silence women of colour, part of a crowd at Womens March, toronto

Womens March, toronto - a man holds up a sign that is a play on the evolution of man meme, as they walk upright they come to a figure of Donald Trump. The last man in the evolution chain turns around and says Go back, we fucked up.

Womens March, Toronto, a woman with a red sign saying This is my resting march face, hams it up for the camera

a man holds a sign that says Fight like a girl. and a woman beside him the march holds a sign that says complacency breeds inequality.

Free Melania | #freemelania

two boys watch protesters at the Womens March, toronto . One of the boys holds a sign that says Free Melania.

a young girl in pink holds a sign that says love love love. Womens March, toronto

a woman stands in a crowd at NathanPhillips Square, Womens March, toronto - she is holding a sign that says Keep your hands off our cuntstiutional rights.

girls are strong

a young girl holds a sign that says girls are strong. She's written it herself on cardboard.

Women have rights and we’re gonna use them!  … with rainbows.

a girl in pink is holding a sign that says WOmen have rights and we're gonna use them. She is shouting as she marches, Womens March, toronto . There are other kids with her

A loud hear us roar!

a woman stands beside the base of one of the statues at QUeens Park, she is holding a large pink sign with big colourful writing that says hear us roar. Womens March, toronto

camera man stands on a high level of ground along with some large black speakers. The heads of some women can be seen , all wearing pink hats for the Womens March

two women smile for the camera as they walk past. Both are wearing red heart shaped glasses.

Donald Trump was at the march too, even if only in effigy.

a person holds an effigy of Donald Trump on a stick up in the air diring the Womens March down University Ave.,

On University Ave., WOmens March, a woman holds a sign that is a merger of two symbols - female and solidarity. Lots of other men and women are around,

a young girl in pink sits on top of the War Memorial at QUeens Park, the parliament buildings are behind her.

a woman holds a sign up above her head. It says My husband wanted to be here but he is doing the laundry

The march stopped for a few minutes when it reached Queen Street.  There was much traffic confusion and chaos (and honking of horns) at the intersection of Queen and University until the police closed all traffic on Queen Street.

intersection of Queen and University, people standing on the sidewalk looking at the Womens March as it stops on University. Policemen trying to direct traffic on Queen as they prepare to close Queen Street for the march

Orange? No. I’m peach.   Great play on words.

a woman is holding a sign at the Womens March, toronto . Donald Trump's head is shaped like a peach and the words say Im peach.

kids walking together in Womens March, toronto hold signs that they have made on cardboard.

Make America gay again!!

A woman holds up a sign that says Make America Gay again. Lots of other people around her at Queens Park at the start of the Womens March, toronto

a woman walking in the Womens March, toronto holds up a read sign that says Make Empathy great again. Lots of other men and women walking in the same picture.

And that’s only part of the crowd at Nathan Phillips Square!

Taken from the upper level at Nathan Phillips Square, overlooking the square which is full of people attending Womens March, toronto . In the foreground are a couple of people who are also on the upper level.

a woman holds a sign that says patriarchy is for dicks

a woman holds up a red sign that says March like a girl, Womens March, toronto

Womens March, toronto - the head of the march goes past Osgoode Hall on QUeen Street. A woman with a megaphone is leading the chants and singing. A large group with a banner that says Womens March is the first group in the walk

standing behind the barricades by the stage at Nathan Phillips Square, a large group of people at the Womens March, toronto . Many signs and many people. and a reporter with a camera.

“Babies against Trump.  We don’t like it when people call Trump a baby – we act better than him.”

a man carries a baby in front of him, with a yellow sign that says Babies against trump, marching in the Womens March in Toronto with other men and women.

a group of people wearing black and holding red carnations is holding a large black coffin on their shoulders. Written on the coffin is the word patriarchy. The death of patriarchy.

a group of people with signs and placards in a crowd at Nathan Phillips Square. Womens March, toronto

Women’s rights are human rights.

two women stand on the sidewalk, one is drinking coffee and wearing a pink hat. The other is holding a sign that says womens rights are human rights in pink letters ona background of black and white photos.

an older womaloosely woven pink hat with wide brim, and a pink top, holds a sign at a march

Womens March, Toronto - women smiling and posing for the camera, wearing pink pussy hats

 

#whyImarch | #womensmarch | #nastywoman | #lovetrumpshate | #noh8

On this day, the 16th of November, in 1885, Louis Riel was hanged in Regina, the capital of the Northwest Territories at the time and the headquarters of the North West Mounted Police.

During that year, Riel led Métis people in the Northwest Resistance (or Northwest Rebellion depending on which side you were on), which was a stand against the Government of Canada because it was encroaching on Metis rights way-of-life.  The Métis were defeated at the siege of Batoche and the Canadian government captured Riel. He was eventually put on trial where he was convicted of treason and executed. As a result, Métis people across Canada were labeled as traitors and for generations many felt the need to hide their Métis culture and heritage.

Riel had previously led the Métis in the Red River Rebellion of 1869-1870.  In 1869 Canada bought Ruperts Land from the Hudsons Bay Company (Ruperts Land covered most of what is now western Canada).   The end result of this rebellion was the formation of the province of Manitoba under the Manitoba Act of 1870.  The Act included some of Riel’s demands such as separate French schools for Métis children and protection of the Roman Catholic religion.   Manitoba was a small piece of what was once Ruperts Land.  A little province surrounded by a large Northwest Territory.   History is often difficult to condense into a couple of paragraphs but there is a lot of information about Riel and the history of western Canada on the internet if you are interested in learning more.

Now, the 16th of November is Louis Riel Day, a day to look to the past and remember what Riel stood for.  It is also a day to look at the present and to recognize the many contributions of the Métis to Canada and to highlight the continuing struggles that Métis continue to face.

below: The Metis flag is raised in front of the parliament building at Queen’s Park. The flag features a large white infinity symbol and the background can be blue or red. The infinity symbol can be seen as a representation of the faith that the Métis culture shall live on forever and/or the joining of two cultures to form one.

raising a blue Metis flag in front of Queens Park

below: After the raising of the flag, the colour party leads the procession through Queen’s Park .

colour party of 6 men carrying flags lead a procession through the park in front of the parliament buildings at Queens Park, autumn and most of the leaves are off the trees.

below: People congregated at the Northwest Rebellion Monument.  This monument honours the 43 men who fell on the battlefields in 1885.  There is no reference to the Métis defenders who also died during the resistance or the Métis desire to negotiate. It reflects the widespread belief that the Métis were traitors, an idea that was prevalent at the time the statue was commissioned.   It was unveiled in 1895; the figure of Peace on the top of the monument was sculpted by Walter Allward.   Since its inception in 1993 the Metis Nation of Ontario has used this monument as the focal point for its Louis Riel Day ceremony.

statue, memorial to those who died in the Northwest Rebellion of 1885, to the soldiers on the winning side, at Queens Park, with people around it, a flag with picture of Louis Riel is planted beside the monument,

below: The base of the Northwest Rebellion memorial is decorated with a picture of Louis Riel along with Metis flags, Metis sashes, a Hudson Bay blanket and a violin.

base of monument with picture of Louis Riel, a violin and a Hudsons Bay blanket on it.

below: Senator Verna Porter-Brunelle opened the ceremony at the base of the memorial to the Northwest Rebellion.  Other government speakers included the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, Dave Levac as well as the Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, David Zimmer.
a woman in a pink jacket stands behind a podium draped with the Metis flag, speaking to a group of people outdoors at QUeens Park on Louis Riel day.

#LouisRielDay

The first three days of November have been wonderful – three beautiful warm sunny days, perfect fall weather.

 below: Taking advantage of the warm afternoon in front of Osgoode Hall.

A woman sits on a bench in front of Osgoode Hall, a stone building. Her back is to the camera. A tree with a few yellow leaves frames the picture.

below: On St. George Street in front of Sir Daniel Wilson residence, University College

college on St. George Street, front of the building with black wrought iron fence in front of it along with a few mature trees with some yellow and rust coloured leaves still on them. The clock tower is visible through the tree branches. There are people on the sidewalk in front of the building.

below: Looking across Kings College Circle towards University College

One small tree in the middle of the grass at Kings College circle in front of University College

below: Maple leaves still on the tree.

maple leaves in autumn colours, rust and orange leaves in the foreground, yellow leaves in the background.

below: Mary Pickford looks over University Avenue.

a bust of Mary Pickford, she is resting her head in one of her hands. In the background is a building along with some bushes and a tree with yellow and orange leaves.

There is an historical plaque beside this statue and it reads: “Born in 1893 in a house which stood near this site, Gladys Marie Smith appeared on stage in Toronto at the age of five. Her theatrical career took her to Broadway in 1907 where she adopted the name Mary Pickford. The actress’s earliest film, “Her First Biscuits”, was released by the Biograph Company in 1909 and she soon established herself as the international cinema’s first great star. Her golden curls and children’s roles endeared her to millions as “America’s Sweetheart”. She was instrumental in founding and directing a major film production company and starred in over fifty feature length films including “Hearts Adrift”, “Pollyanna” and “Coquette”. For the last named film, she received the 1929 Academy Award as the year’s best actress. “

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below: Two women outside Emmanuel College, Queens Park Circle

A blueish bronze statue of two overweight women standing facing each other beside a stone building on the University of Toronto campus. It is autumn and there are leaves on the ground. A group of girls is walking in the background.

below: Northrop Frye sits on a bench on the campus of Victoria College (U of T).

A statue of a man, Northrop Frye, sits on a bench with his legs crossed and an open book on his lap. Another book sits beside him on the bench.

This life sized statue was created by Darren Byers and Fred Harrison and was unveiled in October 2012.

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small purple aster flowers in a garden that is close to being covered with autumn leaves that have fallen off the nearby trees

On Saturday afternoon there was a small rally under the trees of Queens Park.  It was attended by a number of Toronto federal NDP candidates and it was about repealing bill C-51.   C-51 has been called the Anti-Terrorism Bill although it’s full name is:  “An Act to enact the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act and the Secure Air Travel Act, to amend the Criminal Code, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts.”

It was passed in June of this year by the Conservative government with support of the Liberals.  The NDP and Green party have been against this bill since the beginning.  Part of the NDP platform for the present federal election is the promise to repeal Bill C-51 if they are form the next government.

A group of NDP candidates from the GTA including Andrew Cash, Peggy Nash, Akil Sadikali, and Jennifer Hollett,are standing together. Olivia Chow is addressing the small crowd that has come to the rally to repeal Bill C 51. One of the candidates is holding a Tom Mulcair sign.

A woman reporter is talking to another woman at a protest rally. The woman being interviewed is holding a sign that says Thought Police, looks like you've had too much to think

Some people at a protest rally. Two young men are holding signs. One sign says Dump Harper Scrap CSIS. The other sign says People's needs not corporate greed.

Two women are holding up signs protesting Bill C 51.

A statue of the Canadian poet Al Purdy sitting in a park. A girl looking at a smartphone is standing by its feet.

 

 

Protest, rally and march
from Queens Park to Allan Gardens,
5 July 2015

jobs, justice and climate action protest march - the lead banner of the march.  It says Jobs, Justice and the Climate. It is red with white letters and is almost the full width of the street.  A few drummers and dancers are in front of the banner.  Many people with signs and flags are behind the banner.
jobs, justice and climate action protest march -  a man is making large bubbles that float towards the  front of the parade.

below:  A protester prepares to carry a large effigy of Kathleen Wynne, leader of the provincial Liberal party, with the help of some colleagues.

A couple of people are helping a woman prepare to wear a large effigy.  A very large head of a woman wearing dark rimmed glasses.

below: David Suzuki being interviewed by CTV.

David Suzuki is being interviewed by a man from CTV.  A few people are standing behind.

Three young women are making signs to carry in the protest march.  Two are in green T-shirts.  One of the signs says '73 North Americans own the same as 1/2 the continent.'  Jobs, Justice and Climate protest rally and march.

A person wearing a sign that says 'Another photographer marching for #jobsjusticeclimate on his back.

At a protest rally, two women are posing for a picture.  One has a large cut out around her face that makes her face look like a large yellow flower

a groupd of young people standing beside a large yellow banner that says 'Youth marching for Climate Justice' at a protest rally in front of the Ontario parliament buildings.

below: The base of Sir John A. Macdonald’s statue provides a step up for photographers
(It looks like only some of them wanted to take my picture!)

Many photographers are standing on the base of a statue while they wait for a protest march to begin in Toronto at Queens Park

Two people with protest signs on their backs.  One says 'Act like you live here' and the second says 'Stop Debating, Start acting'

A group of people at a protest rally.  Somone is holding up a sign with a picture of Stephen Harper neck deep in water with the words, 'What climate change blub blub blub'

At the jobs, justice and climate action protest rally, a man wearing a hat that looks like an owl head.  He's carrying a sign that says 'Give a hoot'
  below:  ‘Protect Turtle Island’ signs waiting for the march to begin.  North America is referred to as Turtle Island by many Native tribes, Native rights activists, and environmental groups.

A large parachute shaped piece of fabric in bright orange and white lies flat on the ground.  In it are three signs waiting for people to begin marching in the jobs, justice and climate change march.  The signs say 'Protect Turtle Island'

A group of people holding a large red banner that says 'Canadian Unitarians for social justice'

Three women at a protest rally.

A young girl in a bright red Tshirt runs in front of some protesters, one of whom is holding a sign that says Hope.

At the jobs, justice and climate action protest rally, four people hold a banner that says 'TTC riders, a voice for ttc riders' and it has a picture of a street car on it as well.

below:  $15 now refers to raising the minimum wage to $15/hour

jobs, justice and climate action protest march -  a man is holding a sign that says $15 Now.  It is white with red letters.  It stands out because most of the signs around him are all bright red.

jobs, justice and climate action protest march -  a group of people at Queens Park, the back of the statue of Sir John A. Macdonald can be seen.  One woman is holding a sign that says Jobs Justice Climate.  Another person holds up a picture of Pope Francis.  They are all getting ready to march down University Ave.

below: After the rally at Queens Park, protesters marched south on University Ave.
and then east on Dundas St.

policemen on bikes block the street as they direct a march through city streets

jobs, justice and climate action protest march - some of the people marching, a white haired man is holding an orange flag that says Socialistworld.net  Some people are walking their bikes.

A man is walking in a protest march while holding one end of a banner.  He is wearing a large yellow chicken head and a T shirt that says 'this is what a vegan looks like'

two women are walking in the jobs, justice and climate action march in Toronto and both are carrying signs.  One has a large peace symbol and the words 'vegan for life' and the the other sign says 'animal agriculture is responsible for 91 percent of amazon rainforest destruction

A number of women in a protest march, each is holding a different coloured sign and each has a different letter - together they spell 'yes we can'.  Each women is also wearing a coloured box that matches the colour of her sign and each box represents a differ aspect of social policy such as gender equality, primary education, poverty eradication, healthcare,

A diverse group of people walk in a protest march in Toronto

A man in a red shirt pumps his fist in the air as he walks in a protest march

A man is holding up a protest sign with Prime Minister Stephen Harper's head on three monkeys along with the worsd, Hear no science, speak no science, see no science.

Marchers on the jobs, justice and climate action protest march who are carrying a large orange banner that says We have solutions.

 

Two middle aged men walking a in protest.  One of them has a sign that says 'radicalized by Harper'

A large number of people walking in a protest march carrying signs and banners

A man wearing a green party T-shirt is carry a large sign that says 'carbon tax yes'.  There are other green party supporters with him as they walk in a protest march in Toronto

jobs, justice and climate action protest march on University Ave showing many people walking.  Two are holding large white signs with orange letters.  One says Let hope prevail.  The other says There is no Planet B.

jobs, justice and climate action protest march  - a young woman in a head scarf holds a red and white sign, the woman behind her is wearing a floppy hat and there is a sign that says Be Brave in large capital letters above her head.

Canada Day 2015

There were celebrations at a number of locations around the city
including Queens Park and Yonge-Dundas Square.

A young man stands in Dundas Square in an area that has been barricaded off and also in which a large maple leaf outline in red tape has been laid down.  He is wearing a red Canada T shirt and holding a small Canadian flag.

The red outline of a maple leaf was then used to make a “living flag” of people wearing red T-shirts and white T-shirts. The crowd waited patiently behind the barricades while the organizers got their act together. Not everyone stayed on the sidelines!

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Five people pose for a photo.  They are wearing red T shirts and they are standing withing the stem of the maple leaf outline that is taped to the ground.  They are the first ones into the living flag that is trying to be made at Dundas Square as part of a Canada Day celebration

The first part of the “living flag” takes their place in the stem of the maple leaf.

 

A man holds a young girl on his shoulders while the watch a performance of New Choir, a choir that sings old rock songs, as part of a Canada Day celebration at Dundas Square.  The girl is wearing a red hat with white maple leafs on it.  There are Canadian flags hanging from the ceiling of the stage.

Listening to New Choir perform at Yonge Dundas Square

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two women are all dressed in white and sitting in poses to look like statues.  A boy is approaching them to figure them out

The back of a young girl wearing a red baseball cap and sitting on someone's shoulder as she watches an acrobat show on a stage

One of the better seats in the house! Watching the acrobatics at Queens Park.

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A woman all dressed in white is sitting still as if she's a statue.  A man, also wearing a hat, stands behind her mimicking her pose

A man is hamming it up for the camera.  He is wearing a silver and red oversized tophat and a red and white costume.  He is holding the corner of a large Canadian flag

A young girl looks a bit skeptical as she poses with four women dressed in frilly white dresses who are hamming it up for the camera.  Exaggerated facial expressions

A group of characters in red and white Canada Day costumes stop to pose with some boys.  One of the characters has a stuffed beaver that is trying to take a sip of the boy's snowcone.

It’s thirsty work being a beaver!

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Two kids sit on the sidewalk beside two men who are talking.  Yonge Street is in the background, with traffic, including an open topped double decker bus.

a red headed young man is standing on the base of a statue to get a better look at a show, the crowd is in the background.  He is all dressed in red and his Tshirt has the words I am Canadian on it

A young toddler wearing a white flower head band and a red T-shirt, and holding a Canadian flag is being held by her father

An older man in a red T shirt and a funny red and white hat is holding 2 small Canadian flags

Mayor John Tory has a small Canadian flag in his hand as he talks to people at Dundas Square on Canada day.   He's in a white T-shirt.

As I stood as part of the white of the Canadian flag, along came John Tory, also on the white team. Just out of the picture (and also in white) was Miss Teenage Toronto. (What? We have a what? I had no idea there was a Miss Teen Toronto).  Next time I’ll try harder to get a picture of her but this time I was preoccupied with being part of a flag.

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Here’s to the next 148 years!

A person in red and white Canada Day costume is on stilts with three others standing beside, in front of the parliament buildings at Queens Park