Posts Tagged ‘mt pleasant’

Mt. Pleasant cemetery is the final resting place of about 168,000 people.  A small percentage of those are interred within mausoleums, some of which are fancier than others.   The following is a sample of the architecture of the mausoleums that I have seen there (including the doors of course).

below: The Eaton family mausoleum with its corinthian columns.   Timothy Eaton is buried here, the founder of the Eatons department store chain (that no longer exists).  Timothy apprenticed to a merchant in Ireland before emigrating to Canada.  After working in a number of stores in Ontario, he purchased a business at the SW corner of Yonge & Queen.  His store was one of the first to sell goods at a fixed price and only for cash…. no bargaining and no credit.

entrance to Eaton tomb/vault at Mt. Pleasant cemetery, two lions beside the steps that lead to the metal door, large corninthian columns on either side of the door.

fancy stone work over the top of the metal door in the Eaton vault. door is greenish colour with age

close up of a pane in a window with a metal window frame, square with lines dividing the pane into 8 triangles, stained glass window in the background. Looking into a vault at a cemetery

below: The Cox family mausoleum which was built in 1905. Sixteen people are buried here including George Albertus Cox (1840-1914) a business man and Senator, his two wives Margaret (d. 1905) and Amy (d. 1915) and their six children.   The building was designed by Sproat & Rolph who were the same architects that designed the Canada Life Building and the Royal York Hotel.  It cost $50,000 to build.

a metal door in a building in a cemetery, three large columns on each side of the door

below: Detail of the flower motif on the windows of the door above.

looking through the metal bars of a window, bars have little flower shaped metal pieces on it, looking into vault in cemetery, stained glas window in the background.

below: Robert Emmet Kelly died in 1915 while on his honeymoon in Atlantic City.  His wife Bessie had this monument built in his honour.  She was buried there when she died in 1964, 50 years after her husband.

small building in cemetery with words Robert Emmet Kelly carved in stone across the top of the door

below: Last, but not least, the Just sisters.   This mausoleum was originally built for Sir Frank Baillie who died in 1921.   His remains were moved to Oakville in the 1960’s and the building sat empty for a few years.  It was purchased by the Just family and now Gloria Irene Just (d. 1977) and Gladys Irene Just (d. 1970) are interned here.  They were daughters of Thomas Fullerton Just, a mining equipment dealer from Quebec.  Someone has left flowers.

front of cemetery tomb for Just family, wood door with engravings on it.

If you are interested in doors, there are lots of blogs that feature door photos on Thursdays…. check out Thursday Doors organized by Norm 2.0 for more information.   This post is a little late but shall we pretend that it’s still Thursday?

The eastern end of the Kay Gardner Belt Line Park crosses over Yonge St and the subway just south of Davisville station.  It then runs across the north side of Mt. Pleasant cemetery.  It comes to an end at Mt. Pleasant Road where the trail merges into the roads that run through the cemetery.

In 2014 students from Greenwood School painted a mural at this location.  The mural has three main elements.  A train to represent the Belt Line, the name of the community that it is located in (Mt Pleasant Village), and the words ‘use Dominion Coal and Wood’.    The last part is because not long ago, on this site, stood the large concrete silos that the Dominion Coal and Wood company used to store coal and wood.   The shape of the black background is very similar to the shape of the silos if viewed from above.

below: Mural, with Mt. Pleasant Road above it.

blog_domiion_mural_greenwood

mural celebrating mt pleasant village and the old dominion coal and wood silos that used to be at that location. At the end of the belt line trail where it merges into mt pleasant cemetery

below: Plaque located on the site of the old silos (now in the bushes beside a condo)

City of Toronto historical plaque describing the history of the Dominion Coal and Wood silos that used to be on Mt. Pleasant Ave near the old Belt Line Railway tracks.

transcription of the Heritage Toronto plaque:

“Dominion Coal and Wood

Originally located on Danforth Avenue, the Dominion Coal and Wood Company was founded in 1912 by William H. Smith.  In 1929, the company opened a landmark facility on this site.  Its nine adjoining concrete silos were designed by E.P. Muntz Engineering Company.  Coal and wood were transported here by rail car along the former Belt Line Railway and then sold as heating fuel to local businesses and home owners.

Originally just one among many similar suppliers in the city, Dominion Coal and Wood outlasted most of its competitors.  The company expanded into building supplies as coal sales dwindled, but continued to sell coal here until the site was closed in 1999.  Although recognized as an increasingly rare type of industrial architecture, the historic silos were demolished in 2001. “

 

below: The nine silos, about 1972.  The photo is from City of Toronto Archives and was found online at JB’s Warehouse (a good source if you are interested in more information at Dominion Coal and Wood)

picture of the Dominion Coal and Wood silos on Mt. Pleasant, from city of Toronto Archives, taken about 1972. With an old Mt. Pleasant streetcar on the street by the silos.

below: I tried to replicate the above photo, about 42 years later.  The Mt. Pleasant streetcars are long gone as is the gas station on the NW corner of Merton and Mt. Pleasant.  A corner of the tall white apartment building on the right can be seen peaking from behind newer condo buildings.  Of course, the dominant part of the picture is the condo development that was built on the site of the Dominion silos in 2002.

condo building across the street, about 12 storeys high, made of brick and glass, a couple of cars are on the street

Between Lawrence and Eglinton, Mt. Pleasant Road passes over Burke Brook and Blythwood Ravine Park.
This is the graffiti that I saw under that bridge.

graffiti under a bridge - black and white picture of a man in jacket and tie and a hat with a brim.  The top part of his face is in shadow from the hat brim.  He iis shown only from the shoulders up

eyes in shadow

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graffiti under a bridge - line drawing of a man's head with dotted lines dividing it into sections that are numbered

the numbers of a man

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graffiti under a bridge - black and white line drawings of leaves and other biological looking creatures or things.  The words 'yellow ochre' and 'lylith lyl' also appear'

flora and fauna, lylith lyl

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graffiti under a bridge - yellowish gold frame with large line drawing of a smiling person.

crooked smile in frame

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graffiti under a bridge - Kat Will you Marry Me?  was the original words on the wall.  It is partially obscured by a tag.

Did Kat marry him?

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graffiti under a bridge - Crisis?  Cress? In large red letters with green and black drawings above (under the beams that are supporting the bridge)

On Mt Pleasant Road, just north of Davisville Ave. is the Regent Theatre.  It is a rather nondescript brick building with an ugly white piece of something across the front.  Sometimes the names of the movies that are showing appear on the south side of that white thing (on the side you can’t see in the photo!).

The front of the Regent theatre, a two storey red brick building with a large ugly blank white sign across the bottom of the upper storey.

The Regent theatre today.

It was built in 1920 as the Belsize Theatre.  As you can see, the front of the building hasn’t changed much after almost 90 years.

old black and white photo of a stretch of Mt. Pleasant showing some stores and the Belsize Theatre.

Even back then the hydro poles and wires were an eyesore!

A mid life name change and it became the Crest Theatre.

old photo of the Crest Theatre from the late 60's or early 70's.

Crest Theatre – The movie ‘The 7 Year Itch’ came out in 1955.

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